Internationalizing IPv6 Using 128-Bit Unicode
RFC 8369

Document Type RFC - Informational (April 2018; Errata)
Last updated 2018-04-30
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Independent Submission                                         H. Kaplan
Request for Comments: 8369                                128 Technology
Category: Informational                                     1 April 2018
ISSN: 2070-1721

             Internationalizing IPv6 Using 128-Bit Unicode

Abstract

   It is clear that Unicode will eventually exhaust its supply of code
   points, and more will be needed.  Assuming ISO and the Unicode
   Consortium follow the practices of the IETF, the next Unicode code
   point size will be 128 bits.  This document describes how this future
   128-bit Unicode can be leveraged to improve IPv6 adoption and finally
   bring internationalization support to IPv6.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for informational purposes.

   This is a contribution to the RFC Series, independently of any other
   RFC stream.  The RFC Editor has chosen to publish this document at
   its discretion and makes no statement about its value for
   implementation or deployment.  Documents approved for publication by
   the RFC Editor are not candidates for any level of Internet Standard;
   see Section 2 of RFC 7841.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8369.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Kaplan                        Informational                     [Page 1]
RFC 8369                 Unicode IPv6 Addressing            1 April 2018

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  The Need for 128-Bit Code Points  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Unicode IPv6 Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.1.  Reserved Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.2.  Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.3.  IPv6 Routing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Using Unicode IPv6 Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.1.  Uniform Resource Identifiers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.2.  Address Allocation and Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

Kaplan                        Informational                     [Page 2]
RFC 8369                 Unicode IPv6 Addressing            1 April 2018

1.  Introduction

   Unicode [Unicode] is currently limited to 1,114,112 code points,
   encoded in various encoding formats (e.g., UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-32).
   At the time of this document's publication, 136,755 code points have
   been allocated, with more already in the approval process.  Every
   year, more writing scripts, symbols, and emojis are added, while none
   are removed.  After consulting expert mathematicians, we have
   determined that the world will run out of code points someday in the
   future.

   While it might appear that the current rate of code point allocation
   gives us plenty of time to deal with the exhaustion problem, the
   Internet's history has shown that popular number spaces do not fill
   up linearly, but rather exponentially.  And once the size of a
   particular number space becomes entrenched, it takes decades to
   migrate to a larger one.  Therefore, the code point number space must
   be increased as soon as possible.

   The details for expanding the Unicode code point space are not
   covered in this document.  Such details need to be worked out between
   the IETF, ISO, the Unicode Consortium, and various gods.  We assume,
   however, that the code point space will need to grow dramatically,
   and there will continue to be a need for a fixed-length encoding
   scheme similar to UTF-32.  Naturally, the next size increment should
   go from UTF-32 to UTF-128, and thus the rest of this document follows
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