Report from the IAB workshop on Internet Technology Adoption and Transition (ITAT)
draft-iab-itat-report-01

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Replaces draft-lear-iab-itat-report
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Network Working Group                                       E. Lear, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                            March 27, 2014
Intended status: Informational
Expires: September 28, 2014

    Report from the IAB workshop on Internet Technology Adoption and
                           Transition (ITAT)
                        draft-iab-itat-report-01

Abstract

   This document provides an overview of a workshop held by the Internet
   Architecture Board (IAB) on Internet Technology Adoption and
   Transition (ITAT).  The workshop was hosted by the University of
   Cambridge in Cambridge on December 4th and 5th of 2013.  The goal of
   the workshop was to facilitate adoption of Internet protocols,
   through examination of a variety of economic models, with particular
   emphasis at the waist of the hourglass.  This report summarizes
   contributions and discussions.  As the topics were wide ranging,
   there is no single set of recommendations for IETF participants to
   pursue at this time.  Instead, in the classic sense of early
   research, we note areas that deserve further exploration.

   Note that this document is a report on the proceedings of the
   workshop.  The views and positions documented in this report are
   those of the workshop participants and do not necessarily reflect IAB
   views and positions.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 28, 2014.

Copyright Notice

Lear                   Expires September 28, 2014               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                ITAT Report                     March 2014

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Organization of This Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Motivations and Review of Existing Work . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Economics of Protocol Adoption  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.1.  When can bundling help adoption of network
           technologies or services? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.2.  Internet Protocol Adoption: Learning from Bitcoin . . . .   6
     3.3.  Long term strategy for a successful deployment of
           DNSSEC - on all levels  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.4.  Framework for analyzing feasibility of Internet
           protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.5.  Best Effort Service as a Deployment Success Factor  . . .   8
   4.  Innovative / Out There Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.1.  On the Complexity of Designed Systems (and its effect
           on protocol deployment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.2.  Managing Diversity to Manage Technological
           Transition  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     4.3.  On Economic Models of Network Technology Adoption,
           Design, and Viability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   5.  Making Standards Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.1.  Standards: A love/hate relationship with patents  . . . .   9
     5.2.  Bridge Networking Research and Internet
           Standardization: Case Study on Mobile Traffic
           Offloading and IPv6 Transition Technologies . . . . . . .   9
     5.3.  An Internet Architecture for the Challenged . . . . . . .  10
   6.  Other Challenges and Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     6.1.  Resilience of the commons: routing security . . . . . . .  10
     6.2.  Getting to the next version of TLS  . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  Outcomes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     7.1.  Work for the IAB and the IETF . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
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