Instructions to RFC Authors
RFC 1543

Document Type RFC - Informational (October 1993; No errata)
Obsoleted by RFC 2223
Obsoletes RFC 825, RFC 1111
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                          J. Postel
Request for Comments: 1543                                           ISI
Obsoletes: RFCs 1111, 825                                   October 1993
Category: Informational

                      Instructions to RFC Authors

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  This memo
   does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of
   this memo is unlimited.

Table of Contents

   1.   Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
   2.   Editorial Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   3.   Format Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   3a.   ASCII Format Rules  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   3b.   PostScript Format Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   4.   Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   4a.   First Page Heading  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   4b.   Running Header  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   4c.   Running Footer  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   5.   Status Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   6.   Introduction Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   7.   References Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
   8.   Security Considerations Section  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   9.   Author's Address Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   10.  Relation to other RFCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   11.  Protocol Standards Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   12.  Contact  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   13.  Distribution Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   14.  RFC Index  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   15.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   16.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   17.  Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   18.  Appendix - RFC "nroff macros"  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   This Request for Comments (RFC) provides information about the
   preparation of RFCs, and certain policies relating to the publication
   of RFCs.

   The RFC series of notes covers a broad range of interests.  The core
   topics are the Internet and the TCP/IP protocol suite.  However, any

Postel                                                          [Page 1]
RFC 1543              Instructions to RFC Authors           October 1993

   topic related to computer communication may be acceptable at the
   discretion of the RFC Editor.

   Memos proposed to be RFCs may be submitted by anyone.  One large
   source of memos that become RFCs is the Internet Engineering Task
   Force (IETF).  The IETF working groups (WGs) evolve their working
   memos (known as Internet Drafts or I-Ds) until they feel they are
   ready for publication, then the memos are reviewed by the Internet
   Engineering Steering Group (IESG), and if approved sent by the IESG
   to the RFC Editor.

   RFCs are distributed online by being stored as public access files,
   and a short message is sent to the distribution list indicating the
   availability of the memo.

   The online files are copied by the interested people and printed or
   displayed at their site on their equipment.  This means that the
   format of the online files must meet the constraints of a wide
   variety of printing and display equipment.  (RFCs may also be
   returned via e-mail in response to an e-mail query, or RFCs may be
   found using information and database searching tools such as Gopher,
   Wais, WWW, or Mosaic.)

   RFCs have been traditionally published and continue to be published
   in ASCII text.

   While the primary RFCs is always an ASCII text file, secondary or
   alternative versions of RFC may be provided in PostScript.  This
   decision is motivated by the desire to include diagrams, drawings,
   and such in RFCs.  PostScript documents (on paper only, so far) are
   visually more appealing and have better readability.

   PostScript was chosen for the fancy form of RFC publication over
   other possible systems (e.g., impress, interpress, oda) because of
   the perceived wide spread availability of PostScript capable
   printers.

   However, many RFC users read the documents online and use various
   text oriented tools (e.g., emacs, grep) to search them.  Often, brief
   excerpts from RFCs are included in e-mail.  These practices are not
   yet practical with PostScript files.

   PostScript producing systems are less standard than had been assumed
   and that several of the document production systems that claim to
   produce PostScript actually produce nonstandard results.

   In the future, it may be necessary to identify a set of document
   production systems authorized for use in production of PostScript
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