Token Ring Extensions to the Remote Network Monitoring MIB
RFC 1513

Document Type RFC - Historic (September 1993; No errata)
Updates RFC 1271
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                      S. Waldbusser
Request for Comments: 1513                    Carnegie Mellon University
Updates: 1271                                             September 1993

       Token Ring Extensions to the Remote Network Monitoring MIB

Status of this Memo

   This RFC specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" for the standardization state and status
   of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   This memo defines extensions to the Remote Network Monitoring MIB for
   managing 802.5 Token Ring networks.

   The Remote Network Monitoring MIB, RFC 1271, defines a framework for
   remote monitoring functions implemented on a network probe.  That MIB
   defines objects broken down into nine functional groups.  Some of
   those functional groups, the statistics and the history groups, have
   a view of the data-link layer that is specific to the media type and
   require specific objects to be defined for each media type.  RFC 1271
   defined those specific objects necessary for Ethernet.  This
   companion memo defines those specific objects necessary for Token
   Ring LANs.

   In addition, this memo defines some additional monitoring functions
   specifically for Token Ring.  These are defined in the Ring Station
   Group, the Ring Station Order Group, the Ring Station Configuration
   Group, and the Source Routing Statistics Group.

Table of Contents

   1. The Network Management Framework ......................    2
   2. Guidelines for implementing RFC1271 objects on a
      Token Ring network ....................................    3
   2.1 Host Group ...........................................    3
   2.2 Matrix Group .........................................    3
   2.3 Filter Group .........................................    3
   2.4 Other comments .......................................    4
   3. Overview of the RMON Token Ring Extensions MIB ........    4
   3.1 The Token Ring Statistics Groups .....................    4
   3.2 The Token Ring History Groups ........................    5
   3.3 The Token Ring Ring Station Group ....................    5

Waldbusser                                                      [Page 1]
RFC 1513           Token Ring Extensions to RMON MIB      September 1993

   3.4 The Token Ring Ring Station Order Group ..............    5
   3.5 The Token Ring Ring Station Config Group .............    5
   3.6 The Token Ring Source Routing Group ..................    5
   4. Terminology ...........................................    5
   5. Definitions ...........................................    6
   5.1 The Token Ring Mac-Layer Statistics Group ............    6
   5.2 The Token Ring Promiscuous Statistics Group ..........   14
   5.3 The Token Ring Mac-Layer History Group ...............   19
   5.4 The Token Ring Promiscuous History Group .............   27
   5.5 The Token Ring Ring Station Group ....................   32
   5.6 The Token Ring Ring Station Order Group ..............   41
   5.7 The Token Ring Ring Station Config Group .............   43
   5.8 The Token Ring Source Routing Group ..................   47
   6. References ............................................   54
   7. Acknowledgments .......................................   55
   8. Security Considerations ...............................   55
   9. Author's Address ......................................   55

1.  The Network Management Framework

   The Internet-standard Network Management Framework consists of three
   components.  They are:

      STD 16, RFC 1155 [1] which defines the SMI, the mechanisms used
      for describing and naming objects for the purpose of management.
      STD 16, RFC 1212 [2] defines a more concise description mechanism,
      which is wholly consistent with the SMI.

      STD 17, RFC 1213 [3] which defines MIB-II, the core set of managed
      objects for the Internet suite of protocols.

      STD 15, RFC 1157 [4] which defines the SNMP, the protocol used for
      network access to managed objects.

   The Framework permits new objects to be defined for the purpose of
   experimentation and evaluation.

   Managed objects are accessed via a virtual information store, termed
   the Management Information Base or MIB.  Within a given MIB module,
   objects are defined using STD 16, RFC 1212's OBJECT-TYPE macro.  At a
   minimum, each object has a name, a syntax, an access-level, and an
   implementation-status.

   The name is an object identifier, an administratively assigned name,
   which specifies an object type.  The object type together with an
   object instance serves to uniquely identify a specific instantiation
   of the object.  For human convenience, we often use a textual string,
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