Autonomic Networking Use Case for Distributed Detection of SLA Violations
draft-irtf-nmrg-autonomic-sla-violation-detection-10

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Last updated 2017-07-01
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Network Management Research Group                               J. Nobre
Internet-Draft                       University of Vale do Rio dos Sinos
Intended status: Informational                              L. Granville
Expires: January 2, 2018         Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
                                                                A. Clemm
                                                                  Huawei
                                                      A. Gonzalez Prieto
                                                                  VMware
                                                            July 1, 2017

     Autonomic Networking Use Case for Distributed Detection of SLA
                               Violations
          draft-irtf-nmrg-autonomic-sla-violation-detection-10

Abstract

   This document describes a use case for autonomic networking
   concerning monitoring of Service Level Agreements (SLAs).  The use
   case aims to detect violations of SLAs in a distributed fashion,
   striving to optimize and dynamically adapt the autonomic deployment
   of active measurement probes in a way that maximizes the likelihood
   of detecting service level violations with a given resource budget to
   perform active measurements, and is able to do so without any outside
   guidance or intervention.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 2, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

Nobre, et al.            Expires January 2, 2018                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   AN Use Case Detection of SLA Violations       July 2017

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Definitions and Acronyms  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   3.  Current Approaches  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   4.  Use Case Description  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  A Distributed Autonomic Solution  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Intended User Experience  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   7.  Implementation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     7.1.  Device Based Self-Knowledge and Decisions . . . . . . . .  11
     7.2.  Interaction with other devices  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  Comparison with current solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   9.  Related IETF Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   11. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   12. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   13. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14

1.  Introduction

   The Internet has been growing dramatically in terms of size,
   capacity, and accessibility in the last years.  Communication
   requirements of distributed services and applications running on top
   of the Internet have become increasingly demanding.  Some examples
   are real-time interactive video or financial trading.  Providing such
   services involves stringent requirements in terms of acceptable
   latency, loss, or jitter.

   Performance requirements lead to the articulation of Service Level
   Objectives (SLOs) which must be met.  Those SLOs are part of Service
   Level Agreements (SLAs) that define a contract between the provider
   and the consumer of a service.  SLOs, in effect, constitute a service
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