Considerations around Transport Header Confidentiality, Network Operations, and the Evolution of Internet Transport Protocols
draft-ietf-tsvwg-transport-encrypt-17

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (tsvwg WG)
Authors Gorry Fairhurst  , Colin Perkins 
Last updated 2020-09-14 (latest revision 2020-09-08)
Replaces draft-fairhurst-tsvwg-transport-encrypt
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TSVWG                                                       G. Fairhurst
Internet-Draft                                    University of Aberdeen
Intended status: Informational                                C. Perkins
Expires: March 12, 2021                            University of Glasgow
                                                      September 08, 2020

    Considerations around Transport Header Confidentiality, Network
     Operations, and the Evolution of Internet Transport Protocols
                 draft-ietf-tsvwg-transport-encrypt-17

Abstract

   To protect user data and privacy, Internet transport protocols have
   supported payload encryption and authentication for some time.  Such
   encryption and authentication is now also starting to be applied to
   the transport protocol headers.  This helps avoid transport protocol
   ossification by middleboxes, while also protecting metadata about the
   communication.  Current operational practice in some networks inspect
   transport header information within the network, but this is no
   longer possible when those transport headers are encrypted.

   This document discusses the possible impact when network traffic uses
   a protocol with an encrypted transport header.  It suggests issues to
   consider when designing new transport protocols or features.  These
   considerations arise from concerns such as network operations,
   prevention of network ossification, enabling transport protocol
   evolution and respect for user privacy.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 12, 2021.

Fairhurst & Perkins      Expires March 12, 2021                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft         Transport Header Encryption        September 2020

Copyright Notice

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   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Context and Rationale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Use of Transport Header Information in the Network  . . .   6
     2.2.  Authentication of Transport Header Information  . . . . .   8
     2.3.  Perspectives on Observable Transport Header Fields  . . .   8
   3.  Current uses of Transport Headers within the Network  . . . .  12
     3.1.  To Identify Transport Protocols and Flows . . . . . . . .  13
     3.2.  To Understand Transport Protocol Performance  . . . . . .  14
     3.3.  To Support Network Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
     3.4.  To Support Network Diagnostics and Troubleshooting  . . .  24
     3.5.  To Support Header Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   4.  Encryption and Authentication of Transport Headers  . . . . .  26
     4.1.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     4.2.  Approaches to Transport Header Protection . . . . . . . .  27
   5.  Addition of Transport OAM Information to Network-Layer
       Headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
     5.1.  Use of OAM within a Maintenance Domain  . . . . . . . . .  29
     5.2.  Use of OAM across Multiple Maintenance Domains  . . . . .  29
   6.  Intentionally Exposing Transport Information to the Network .  30
     6.1.  Exposing Transport Information in Extension Headers . . .  30
     6.2.  Common Exposed Transport Information  . . . . . . . . . .  31
     6.3.  Considerations for Exposing Transport Information . . . .  31
   7.  Implications of Protecting the Transport Headers  . . . . . .  31
     7.1.  Independent Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
     7.2.  Characterising "Unknown" Network Traffic  . . . . . . . .  34
     7.3.  Accountability and Internet Transport Protocols . . . . .  34
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