The SPIRITS Architecture
RFC 3136

Document Type RFC - Informational (June 2001; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                L. Slutsman, Editor
Request for Comments: 3136                                     AT&T Labs
Category: Informational                                      I. Faynberg
                                                                   H. Lu
                                                             M. Weissman
                                                     Lucent Technologies
                                                               June 2001

                        The SPIRITS Architecture

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document describes the architecture for supporting SPIRITS
   services, which are those originating in the PSTN (Public Switched
   Telephone Network)and necessitating the interactions between the PSTN
   and the Internet.  (Internet Call Waiting, Internet Caller-ID
   Delivery, and Internet Call Forwarding are examples of SPIRIT
   services.)  Specifically, it defines the components constituting the
   architecture and the interfaces between the components.

1. Introduction

   This document describes the architecture for supporting SPIRITS
   services, which are those originating in the PSTN (Public Switched
   Telephone Network) and necessitating the interactions between the
   PSTN and the Internet.  (Internet Call Waiting, Internet Caller-ID
   Delivery, and Internet Call Forwarding are examples of SPIRIT
   services.)  Specifically, it defines the components constituting the
   architecture and the interfaces between the components.

   The rest of the document is organized as follows:

   +  Section 2 describes example SPIRITS services from the end-user
      point of view;

   +  Section 3 describes the SPIRITS architecture;

Slutsman, et al.             Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 3136                The SPIRITS Architecture               June 2001

   +  Section 4 contains security considerations;

   +  Section 5 contains acknowledgments;

   +  Section 6 contains references; and

   +  Appendix contains the figure.

2. Brief Description of Example SPIRITS Services

   To illustrate the motivation for the overall SPIRIT architecture,
   this section provides a brief description of the example SPIRITS
   services:

   +  Internet Call Waiting (ICW),

   +  Internet Caller-ID Delivery, and

   +  Internet Call Forwarding.

   These services are considered from the end-user point of view under
   the assumptions below:

   +  Service subscription (or cancellation) is a separate process and
      may be done over the telephone, via postal mail, or over the Web.

   +  The subscriber's IP host (e.g., a PC) is loaded with the necessary
      software [including a Personal Identification Number (PIN) and the
      IP addresses of the SPIRITS servers] for realizing the SPIRITS
      services.  The software may be sent by postal mail or downloaded
      from the Web.

   +  The subscriber activates a SPIRITS service by an act of service
      session registration, which can take place anytime after he (or
      she) is connected to the Internet.  The subscriber may specify the
      life span of the session.  As soon as the session ends, the
      SPIRITS service is deactivated.  Naturally, the subscriber should
      also be able to deactivate a SPIRITS service anytime during the
      service session.

   For certain services (such as ICW or Caller-ID Delivery) the
   assumption is that the service subscriber has a single telephone line
   and a PC, which is connected to the Internet via this telephone.
   (Only under this assumption these services make sense.)
   Nevertheless, in other services (such as Web-based Call Center, in
   which a call center assistant could re-direct or reject a call
   presented in a pop-up window) this assumption may be unnecessary or
   even inapplicable.

Slutsman, et al.             Informational                      [Page 2]
RFC 3136                The SPIRITS Architecture               June 2001

2.1 Internet Call Waiting (ICW)

   The Internet call waiting service enables a subscriber engaged in an
   Internet dial-up session to

      o  be notified of an incoming call to the very same telephone line
         that is being used for the Internet connection;

      o  specify the desirable treatment of the call; and

      o  have the call handled as specified.

   The details of the ICW service lie in the ways that a waiting call
   can be treated [1].  Typical ways for handling a call include:

   +  Accept the incoming call over the PSTN by terminating the Internet
      connection.  (As switching cannot be done immediately, the caller
      may hear an opening announcement followed by the "ringing" tone.)
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