ISO Transport Service on top of TCP (ITOT)
RFC 2126

Document Type RFC - Proposed Standard (March 1997; Errata)
Updates RFC 1006
Was draft-pouffary-itot (individual)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                     Y. Pouffary
Request for Comments: 2126              Digital Equipment Corporation
Category: Standards Track                                    A. Young
                                                     ISODE Consortium
                                                           March 1997

               ISO Transport Service on top of TCP (ITOT)

Status of the Memo

   This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
   and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   This document is a revision to STD35, RFC1006 written by Marshall T.
   Rose and Dwight E. Cass. Since the release of RFC1006 in May 1987,
   much experience has been gained in using ISO transport services on
   top of TCP. This document refines the protocol and will eventually
   supersede RFC1006.

   This document describes the mechanism to allow ISO Transport Services
   to run over TCP over IPv4 or IPv6. It also defines a number of new
   features, which are not provided in RFC1006.

   The goal of this version is to minimise the number of changes to
   RFC1006 and ISO 8073 transport protocol definitions, while maximising
   performance, extending its applicability and protecting the installed
   base of RFC1006 users.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction, Motivation.....................................2
   2. The Model....................................................3
   2.1 ISO Transport Model.........................................3
   2.2 ISO Transport over TCP (ITOT) Model.........................4
   2.3 Overview of Protocol and Service............................5
   3 Service Definition............................................5
   3.1 Transport Service Definition................................5
   3.1.1 Transport Service Definition Primitives...................6
   3.2 Network Service Definition..................................7
   3.2.1 ISO 8348 CONS primitives..................................7
   3.2.2 TCP Service primitives....................................8
   3.2.3 Mapping TCP as a Network Service Provider.................8

Pouffary & Young            Standards Track                     [Page 1]
RFC 2126              ISO Transport on top of TCP             March 1997

   3.2.3.1 Network Connection Establishment........................8
   3.2.3.2 Network Data Transfer...................................9
   3.2.3.3 Network Connection Release.............................10
   4. Transport Protocol Specification............................10
   4.1 Class 0 over TCP...........................................10
   4.1.1 Connection Establishment.................................11
   4.1.2 Data Transfer............................................11
   4.1.3 Connection Release.......................................11
   4.2 Class 2 over TCP...........................................12
   4.2.1 Connection Establishment.................................12
   4.2.2 Data Transfer............................................13
   4.2.3 Connection Release.......................................15
   4.3 TPKT Packet Format.........................................15
   5. Address representations.....................................16
   5.1 String representation of ITOT access point addresses.......17
   5.2 OSI Network Address encoding...............................17
   6. Notes to Implementors.......................................17
   6.1 TCP Connection Establishment...............................17
   6.2 TCP Data transfer..........................................17
   6.3 Class negotiation..........................................18
   6.4 Default maximum TPDU size..................................18
   6.5 Class 0 TPDU bit encoding..................................18
   6.6 Class 2 Options............................................19
   6.7 Class 2 Expedited Data Acknowledgement.....................21
   6.8 Class 2 Normal Data and Expedited Data handling............21
   6.9 Class 2 Forward Connection procedure.......................22
   6.10 TPKT......................................................22
   7. Rationale - Interoperability with RFC1006...................22
   8. Security Considerations.....................................23
   Acknowledgements...............................................23
   References.....................................................23
   Authors' Addresses.............................................25

1. Introduction, Motivation

   There are two basic approaches which can be taken when "porting" ISO
   applications to TCP/IP ([RFC793],[RFC791]) and IPv6 [IPV6]
   environments. One approach is to port each individual application
   separately, developing local protocols on top of TCP. A second
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