Meeting Modalities for the Future
draft-lear-we-gotta-to-stop-meeting-like-this-01

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Network Working Group                                            E. Lear
Internet-Draft                                             Cisco Systems
Intended status: Informational                             July 22, 2019
Expires: January 23, 2020

                   Meeting Modalities for the Future
            draft-lear-we-gotta-to-stop-meeting-like-this-01

Abstract

   The IETF currently meets three times per year in various parts of the
   world.  Somewhere around 1,000 people all get into planes, consume
   carbon, and then attend various meetings in what often is a jetlagged
   stupor.  We gotta stop meeting like this.  This draft calls on the
   LLC to research on the community's behalf new modalities for IETF
   face-to-face meetings.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 23, 2020.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of

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   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Why We Meet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.2.  The Negatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Finding alternatives  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Changes from Earlier Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5

1.  Introduction

   For the last few decades, the Internet Engineering Task Force has
   brought together between 900 and 2,000 engineers and support staff
   from various points around the globe to various points around the
   globe, three times per year.  This, despite the fact that we're
   supposed to be the people who design, maintain, and showcase the
   latest Internet technologies.

   There are both positive and negative impacts on in-person meetings.

1.1.  Why We Meet

   [I-D.ietf-mtgvenue-iaoc-venue-selection-process] explains in great
   detail why we as an organization meet in person.  The largest
   positive impact is that we are able to work together in a collegial
   way to accomplish tasks in person that for whatever reason could not
   be accomplished via other means.

   Also, as perhaps is demonstrated by societies more broadly, there is
   a need for people to establish relationships so that people can more
   recognize each other as people, rather than just as bits on the wire.

   We also meet to cross-fertilize between efforts, so that transport
   people can provide application discussions, and security people can
   help the rest of us to develop secure protocols.

   Finally, we meet to test interopability and capabilities in
   "Hackathons", where the focus is on coding in a social context.  If
   code is law, this is law being made.

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1.2.  The Negatives

   Due to the number of working groups meeting, each working group often
   gets between one and three hours to meet, and no more.  Unless the
   value to a person is the hallway conversations, if someone's primary
   task is to advance work in one or two working groups, that person has
   travelled a long way for a very limited amount of face time.

   o  The cost of bringing us together on individuals and sponsors can
      range from US $2,000 to $5,000 per person, when considering
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