Report from the IAB Workshop on Managing Radio Networks in an Encrypted World (MaRNEW)
RFC 8462

Document Type RFC - Informational (October 2018; No errata)
Last updated 2018-10-12
Replaces draft-nrooney-marnew-report
Stream IAB
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream IAB state Published RFC
Consensus Boilerplate Yes
RFC Editor Note (None)
Internet Architecture Board (IAB)                              N. Rooney
Request for Comments: 8462                               S. Dawkins, Ed.
Category: Informational                                     October 2018
ISSN: 2070-1721

                    Report from the IAB Workshop on
         Managing Radio Networks in an Encrypted World (MaRNEW)

Abstract

   The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) and GSM Association (GSMA) held
   a joint workshop on Managing Radio Networks in an Encrypted World
   (MaRNEW), on September 24-25, 2015.  This workshop aimed to discuss
   solutions for bandwidth optimization on mobile networks for encrypted
   content, as current solutions rely on unencrypted content, which is
   not indicative of the security needs of today's Internet users.  The
   workshop gathered IETF attendees, IAB members, and participants from
   various organizations involved in the telecommunications industry
   including original equipment manufacturers, content providers, and
   mobile network operators.

   The group discussed Internet encryption trends and deployment issues
   identified within the IETF and the privacy needs of users that should
   be adhered to.  Solutions designed around sharing data from the
   network to the endpoints and vice versa were then discussed; in
   addition, issues experienced when using current transport-layer
   protocols were also discussed.  Content providers and Content
   Delivery Networks (CDNs) gave their own views of their experiences
   delivering their content with mobile network operators.  Finally,
   technical responses to regulation were discussed to help the
   regulated industries relay the issues of impossible-to-implement or
   bad-for-privacy technologies back to regulators.

   A group of suggested solutions were devised, which will be discussed
   in various IETF groups moving forward.

Rooney & Dawkins              Informational                     [Page 1]
RFC 8462                         MaRNEW                     October 2018

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for informational purposes.

   This document is a product of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB)
   and represents information that the IAB has deemed valuable to
   provide for permanent record.  It represents the consensus of the
   Internet Architecture Board (IAB).  Documents approved for
   publication by the IAB are not candidates for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 7841.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8462.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Rooney & Dawkins              Informational                     [Page 2]
RFC 8462                         MaRNEW                     October 2018

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.1.  Understanding "Bandwidth Optimization"  . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.2.  Topics  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.3.  Organization of This Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.4.  Use of Note Well and the Chatham House Rule . . . . . . .   6
     1.5.  IETF and GSMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   2.  Scene-Setting Sessions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     2.1.  Scene Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
       2.1.1.  Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.1.2.  Encryption Statistics and Radio Access Network
               Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.2.  Encryption Deployment Considerations  . . . . . . . . . .   9
     2.3.  Awareness of User Choice (Privacy)  . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   3.  Network or Transport Solution Sessions  . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.1.  Sending Data Up/Down for Network Management Benefits  . .  11
       3.1.1.  Competition, Cooperation, and Mobile Network
               Complexities  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   4.  Transport Layer: Issues, Optimization, and Solutions  . . . .  13
   5.  Application-Layer Optimization, Caching, and CDNs . . . . . .  14
   6.  Technical Analysis and Response to Potential Regulatory
       Reaction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   7.  Suggested Principles and Solutions  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
     7.1.  Better Collaboration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
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