Autonomic Networking Use Case for Distributed Detection of SLA Violations
draft-irtf-nmrg-autonomic-sla-violation-detection-01

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Network Management Research Group                               J. Nobre
Internet-Draft                                              L. Granville
Intended status: Informational   Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
Expires: May 14, 2015                                           A. Clemm
                                                               A. Prieto
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                       November 10, 2014

     Autonomic Networking Use Case for Distributed Detection of SLA
                               Violations
          draft-irtf-nmrg-autonomic-sla-violation-detection-01

Abstract

   This document describes a use case for autonomic networking in
   distributed detection of Service Level Agreement (SLA) violations.
   It is one of a series of use cases intended to illustrate
   requirements for autonomic networking.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 14, 2015.

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Nobre, et al.             Expires May 14, 2015                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   AN Use Case Detection of SLA Violations   November 2014

   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Current Approaches  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Benefits of an Autonomic Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   5.  Intended User and Administrator Experience  . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Analysis of Parameters and Information Involved . . . . . . .   5
     6.1.  Device Based Self-Knowledge and Decisions . . . . . . . .   6
     6.2.  Interaction with other devices  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Comparison with current solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Related IETF Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   9.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   11. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   12. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     12.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     12.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   The Internet has been growing dramatically in terms of size and
   capacity, and accessibility in the last years.  Besides that, the
   communication requirements of distributed services and applications
   running on top of the Internet have become increasingly strict.  That
   is the case due to the impact of disrespecting such requirements
   (e.g., latency in trading can have a high cost).  Thus, those
   requirements are included in SLA specifications (examples of service
   fulfillment clauses can be found on [RFC7297]).  Violations on these
   requirements usually present significant financial loss, which can by
   divided in two types.  First, there is the loss incurred by the
   service users (e.g., the trader) and the loss incurred by the service
   provider in terms of penalties for not meeting the service.  Thus,
   the service level requirements of critical network services have
   become a key concern for network administrators.  To ensure that SLAs
   are not being violated, service levels need to be constantly
   monitored at the network infrastructure layer.  To that end, network
   measurements must take place.

   Network measurement mechanisms are performed through either active or
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