Implications of Blocking Outgoing Ports Except Ports 80 and 443
draft-blanchet-iab-internetoverport443-02

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Last updated 2014-02-01 (latest revision 2013-07-31)
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This Internet-Draft is no longer active. A copy of the expired Internet-Draft can be found at
https://www.ietf.org/archive/id/draft-blanchet-iab-internetoverport443-02.txt

Abstract

Users are often connected to Internet with very few outgoing ports available, such as only port 80 and 443 over TCP. This situation has many implications on designing, deploying and using IETF protocols, such as encaspulating protocols within HTTP, difficulty to do traffic engineering, quality of service, peer-to-peer, multi-channel protocols or deploying new transport protocols. This document describes the situation and its implications.

Authors

Marc Blanchet (Marc.Blanchet@viagenie.ca)

(Note: The e-mail addresses provided for the authors of this Internet-Draft may no longer be valid.)