Synchronizing Internet Clock frequency protocol (sic)
draft-alavarez-hamelin-tictoc-sic-01

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TICTOC                                           J. Alvarez-Hamelin, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                              D. Samaniego
Updates: none (if approved)                                    A. Ortega
Intended status: Standards Track             Universidad de Buenos Aires
Expires: December 30, 2018                                       R. Geib
                                                        Deutsche Telekom
                                                           June 28, 2018

         Synchronizing Internet Clock frequency protocol (sic)
                  draft-alavarez-hamelin-tictoc-sic-01

Abstract

   Synchronizing Internet Clock Frequency specifies a new secure method
   to synchronize difference clocks on the Internet, assuring smoothness
   (i.e., frequency stability) and robustness to man-in-the-middle
   attacks.  In 90% of all cases, Synchronized Internet Clock Frequency
   is highly accurate, with a Maximum Time Interval Error less than 25
   microseconds by a minute.  Synchronized Internet Clock Frequency is
   based on a regular packet exchange and works with commodity terminal
   hardware.

Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 30, 2018.

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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  sic frequency protocol overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  The formal definition of sic frequency protocol . . . . . . .   8
     3.1.  Algorithm description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.2.  Protocol definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     3.3.  Protocol packet specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     3.4.  Minimum sic deployment  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
   4.  Implementation of sic frequency protocol  . . . . . . . . . .  17
     4.1.  Evaluation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   5.  Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   Appendix A.  Example of RTT to NTP servers  . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24

1.  Introduction

   There are different types of clock synchronization on the Internet.
   NTP [RFC5905] remains one of the most popular because a potential
   user does not need any extra hardware, and it is practically a
   standard in most of the operating systems distributions.  Its working
   principle relies on time servers having some kind of precise clock
   source, like atomic clocks or GPS based.  For most of the needs, NTP
   provides an accurate synchronization.  Moreover, NTP recently
   incorporates some strategies oriented to avoid man-in-the-middle
   (MitM) attacks.  NTPs potential accuracy is in the order of tens of
   milliseconds.

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